UPDATES – Numerous Mainstream Media Outlets Cover The Dusty Rhodes’ Passing – The Very Latest

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UPDATE x 12: The mainstream media has picked up on the death of Dusty Rhodes. The LA Times, The New York Times, ESPN, CNN.com, The Bleacher Report, Forbes and more are all carrying the story. You can expect MANY more mainstream media outlets to pick up on the story in the coming days. Jonathan Coachman spoke with ESPN (see link provided) while Jim Ross spoke with the LA Times (see link provided).

As noted, the LA Times article features a quote from Jim Ross, who said of Rhodes, “He was arguably the most charismatic performer of all time. His amazing unique verbal styling will never be duplicated or exceeded. He was exactly what he portrayed on TV: A blue-collar, common man, who rose from being son of farmer to being a part of American pop culture, whose memory will live forever. Therefore, for many he was truly the American dream.”

UPDATE x 11: Sports anchor Scott Stanford (the WWE announcer) had Jim Ross on discussing Rhodes’ passing earlier today.

The segment opened with clips of Dusty Rhodes’ WWE Hall of Fame induction. Stanford noted Rhodes was a “pop culture icon.”



Ross commented that Dusty was a larger than life pop culture hero and people recognized him because he sounded different, he looked different and was a trailblazer who did things that wrestlers before him had not done.

Ross said that Rhodes showed that with charisma and heart, you could connect with the audience and that you didn’t need to be a bodybuilder to make it in pro wrestling.

He noted Rhodes was the son of a plumber in Texas and always portrayed himself as a “blue collar hero.”

Stanford closed the segment noting Dusty was gone “way too soon.”

UPDATE x 10: Sports anchor Scott Stanford (the WWE announcer) had Jim Ross on discussing Rhodes’ passing earlier today.

The segment opened with clips of Dusty Rhodes’ WWE Hall of Fame induction. Stanford noted Rhodes was a “pop culture icon.”



Ross commented that Dusty was a larger than life pop culture hero and people recognized him because he sounded different, he looked different and was a trailblazer who did things that wrestlers before him had not done.

Ross said that Rhodes showed that with charisma and heart, you could connect with the audience and that you didn’t need to be a bodybuilder to make it in pro wrestling.

He noted Rhodes was the son of a plumber in Texas and always portrayed himself as a “blue collar hero.”

Stanford closed the segment noting Dusty was gone “way too soon.”

UPDATE x 9: Jim Ross will appear on tonight’s WPIX Sportsdesk broadcast with Scott Stanford. Ross will be on at 10:45 PM discussing Dusty Rhodes’ passing.

At the WWE NXT house show Thursday there was a ten-bell salute to Rhodes. Following the salute, the crowd chanted “Thank You Dusty!” for several minutes. In addition, Big Cass and Enzo Amore hit Bionic Elbows during their segment.

Here is Jonathan Coachman on ESPN talking about Rhodes’ passing

Sean “X-Pac” Waltman tweeted out this 1983 commercial featuring Dusty Rhodes:


UPDATE x 8: While WWE took what was described as a “short break” as the company “shut down” the second day of the WWE Tough Enough tryouts after news of Dusty Rhodes’ death hit, Triple H took to Twitter to note that the camp has resumed in Dusty’s honor:

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UPDATE x 7: < a href=”http://www.twitlonger.com/show/n_1smklsp” target=”_blank”>Sami Zayn posted a tribute to Dusty Rhodes via Twitlonger. You can read it in full below.

Earlier today, I was devastated to hear about the passing of Dusty Rhodes. Words like ‘shock’ and ‘sadness’ come to mind, but don’t truly capture the whirlwind of emotions that take place when you are blindsided by news like this. It was particularly shocking to me because I had seen him almost every day this week at the WWE Performance Center when I went in to rehab my shoulder. He appeared to be in good health and so it was really hard for me to believe that the news was true. But as I read more and more about it, and tears filled my eyes, I didn’t know what to do with myself. So I came home and decided to just write a little bit about Dusty. Many mourners referred to Dusty as a great mentor and a great teacher, which he absolutely was. But I would like to share with you the little things about Dusty that I greatly appreciated in my time with him. He was a great guy.

I need to start by stating that Dusty was a particularly huge influence and a great help to me when I first arrived at WWE. I started with the WWE in February 2013, reporting to FCW in Tampa, FL, the developmental territory at the time and predecessor for the WWE Performance Center in Orlando. Despite coming to WWE with 11 years of experience already under my belt, the idea of “cutting a promo” terrified me when I first got here. Though I had done a lot before getting to WWE, my interviews or “promos” had consisted of only a few words. I had relied on a lot of my non-verbal skills to get to WWE, but the jig was up now that I had signed. It was time to learn, and school was in session every Thursday at the FCW arena: promo class with Dusty Rhodes.

I don’t know if you’ve ever had to do something that you weren’t good at, in front of someone who happened to be one of the best of all time at it, but needless to say it is intimidating. But Dusty washed away a lot of my fears very quickly, as he took a liking to me right away, and was very nurturing. He really encouraged me to speak in a conversational and natural manner. There is no greater confidence booster than getting a sign of approval from one of the greatest talkers in the history of our industry. As my confidence grew, so too did my interview skills. After every interview, we would tell me what he liked, what not to do, and would frequently remark how I “reminded him of a young Robin Williams”. It made me laugh every time, and it still does, because I still don’t see it.

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