-- Today, the Professional Wrestling Hall of Fame will be inducting Jim Cornette, The Wild Samoans, Dominic DeNucci, Jimmy Snuka and Wendi Richter. The Hall will also induct Junkyard Dog, Maurice Tillet and Abe Coleman posthumously. The ceremony will take place in Amsterdam, New York. More details on the Hall of Fame can be found at PWHF.org. Below is a video showcasing highlights from the previous ceremony:

-- J.J. Dillon was a special guest on Inside the Ropes Radio, where he discussed working behind the scenes of WWE & WCW, as well as his thoughts on TNA, the Hulk Hogan vs. Ric Flair feud in 1991 and more. Here are some highlights:

Going into the WWE Hall of Fame: It has to be right up there near the top. I always said, I had a storied book career. It was my dream to be a professional wrestler. Recognition, as a member of the Hall of Fame is something you don't even dare to dream about it.

On Tully Blanchard and the Four Horsemen: I had followed Tully's career for many years. I ended up in the Mid Atlantic Area and Tully was managed by the Baby Doll and I always wanted to manage a great athlete like Tully and it came to be, at the time Tully was the TV Champion, Flair was the World Champ and Ole/Arn were the tag champs. One day we were doing promotion for a town and we were told, ‘Hey you guys have all the titles you should go out and do an interview' so I went out because I was managing Tully at the time. So it wasn't something that was pre planned or had been booked creatively and Arn said ‘You look at us and never have people reeked so much havoc, you'd have to go back in history to the four horsemen of the apocalypse' and held up four fingers, I then went from being not only Tully's manager but becoming the leader of the group in a great run that would last for years.

On the Ric Flair vs. Hulk Hogan feud in 1991: People thought it would be a lot hotter match than it ended up being at the time. I was working in creative. They had a match in Tampa, where Hulk lived at the time. You think if there's one place that'll blow up the attendance in terms of the advance that'd be it but it was disappointing and I remember Vince's comment was "I think maybe this match was put together five years too late." I think that said it all. I don't think it was him not showcasing Ric well, had it been five years earlier it would have done much better.

On working with WWE: As I look back, I don't remember it being a difficult time. I was always a business man. I arrived there prior to WrestleMania V. Here was a company that was doing phenomenally well and I'm here with them. There's a lot of traditionalists who don't agree with where Vince took his company, my roots are with the NWA with smaller venues, a lot more emotion but at WrestleMania 28, we came to the stadium about a half way through the show they brought us out, and you look up and see 78,000 people and to get the response from those fans. It's like the night before at the Hall of Fame, I got goosebumps that night just like when I wrestled in Madison Square Garden.

Vince was always given credit when something was successful and always shifted blame when something didn't work. The Gobbledy Gooker was one that I think Vince liked the idea, but was a disaster of Guerrero coming out of an egg. I remember Gene Okerlund's face who was trying to conduct an interview with this guy in a chicken suit after coming out of an egg. Some things you feel confident will be successful can fall flat on their face. The beauty of it is, the ultimate decision is the wrestling fans. You try to feel the pulse of the wrestling fan.

On working with WCW: Really difficult for me, I was always a team player and these are the people that are paying me so I'm going to do what they tell me to do. The nWo enjoyed success there for a while but here were Nash and Hall who were used to getting these massive merchandise cheques which they were no longer getting so they went to Bischoff and they manipulated Eric Bischoff into giving them guaranteed contracts. It just spiralled out of control. There was no-one in higher management who looked over Bischoff's shoulders to see if...