Nigel McGuinness Discusses Documentary, The Use Of Blood, More

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Former ROH World Champion, TNA star and current ROH "Matchmaker" Nigel McGuinness joined Kayfabe Wrestling Radio Tuesday Night. In a nearly 30 minute interview, he talked about the creation of his documentary "The Last of McGuinness", using Eddie Edwards as a cameraman for the project, his thoughts on some calling him a ‘modern day ROH legend', does he hope wrestling will return more towards wrestling and away from gimmicks and storylines, his views on blood in wrestling today, how to move forward training people perhaps against blood loss and unprotected chair shots in wrestling, the testing standards in some of the major wrestling federations, being named ‘Matchmaker' of ROH, his experiences with improve comedy and more.

His inspirations for doing the final tour and DVD documentary: "It was really (Colt) Cabana; ‘Cabana's Road Diaries' I think was really a big inspiration. You know, cooked him a little bit and he was happy how it turned out. Took a long time from the time they started filming it to actually get it finishing, I think two and a half years for it to finally get out there but he said it turned out well for him, so I thought well, you know, I'll give it a shot. I didn't know anything about it at the time, I didn't know how to even shoot footage or even the first thing about editing it but like he said to me ‘You just gotta give it a go'. So I did, I gave it a go and you've seen the results."

His thoughts on some calling him a ‘modern day ROH legend': "Well, thank you, I appreciate it. A lot of people were involved, from day one when Gabe had that idea of what Ring of Honor was going to be and toeing that fine line between putting too much into storylines and letting the boys go out there and sort of get over on their own; that's why Gabe (Sapolsky) was so good at what he did and Cary (Silkin) obviously standing behind the company when we had some difficult financial times. Some many guys came through there: Alex Shelly, Austin Aries and the list just goes on of some many talented guys who came through Ring of Honor."

Does he have hope wrestling will return to wrestling and not just storylines and gimmicks: "Um, no. You know, I think Ring of Honor is doing a great job of trying to fill that niche, fill that niche for people that want to see more action bell to bell, believable sort of stuff. But, for it to become mainstream like it used to be in the 70's; where you'd see a Dory Funk and a Jack Brisco go out there, or those sort of guys on a national level, I'm not really sure if people have the, what's that word, the patience to watch it, to watch a story develop without the backstory behind it. It's tough, it's difficult; I think that with Ring of Honor going forward, that's what we have to do; we have to try and understand our audience and decide which direction we're going in. And I think now, with Delirious at the helm, we've certainly got a good game plan to do that."

His views on the use of blood in wrestling today: "What's that say when you see someone covered in blood now? How do you feel; do you just brush it off and go ok, or does it have an effect where now… I'm hoping, I would hope now that anyone watching that sort of thing would have a stronger appreciation for the dangers involved. I'm not going to tell anybody how to function; I'm not going to tell any company necessarily; I think changes need to be made. I don't think there's anybody in this day and age that can look at unmitigated blood loss, intentional blood loss in a match and thing that's really a good idea. You know, TNA, they test guys every 6 months; they've vaccinated all of their wrestlers for Hepatitis B. So, they've certainly taken some steps to protect their guys, which I fully applaud. My concern is with Ring of Honor, because it is the company I work for now, and I've talked to the people in charge and everyone is on the same page; intentional blood loss, I don't think, is a prudent thing in today's world and I think they all agree with that and we're currently in the process of basically trying to get some kind of working protocol,...