Money in the Bank
Money in the Bank

A Homage To The Working Man and Woman – 2020 Money In The Bank

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In the middle of a global pandemic, when almost everything seems hanging in the balance, one thing is certain – the working men and women all over the world are risking their lives to stabilize normalcy. And that is sort of poetic after watching this year’s Money in the Bank PPV on the WWE Network.

If you haven’t watched the event and don’t want to be spoiled, don’t read anymore. Come back after you’ve given yourself time to watch the event. Or, just continue reading to get my take.

As seen this past Sunday, Otis narrowly won the briefcase after a quick juggle by AJ Styles and King Corbin on top of the ladder. The match, which included an entertaining walkthrough of Titan Towers in Stamford, Connecticut, also had brief cameos by fellow legends (including Vince McMahon himself), and a collaborative match that brought both the men and women together in the main event match.

As wild and insane some of the spots were in the match (we’re looking at you Corbin), the match was entertaining. You can’t take away the fact that an event that is being taken place during a time when sports and most events aren’t even considered, WWE has taken a unique approach. Cinematic matches such as the Boneyard match with Undertaker and AJ Styles, and the Firefly Fun House with John Cena and Bray Wyatt, showcased what is possible without a live crowd.


Related Read: The Undertaker stole the show at WrestleMania 36


Not everyone will agree with these types of matches. I understand cinematic matches have a different sense of visual appearance which is completely different from the traditional wrestling matchups. However, on the opposite, traditional matches without a crowd, including those performed at the Performance Center, aren’t exactly entertaining on their own right. In some cases, they can be downright boring without a crowd.

Setting up cinematic matchups, especially those with hidden or closed off locations other than inside the Performance Center studio, are showing off a unique appeal to entertainment. It is demonstrating that hidden beneath the reality outside, there is something to take our mind away. With or without a crowd, there is energy, and right now, WWE is throwing everything out there to see what works and what doesn’t.

Related Read: Firefly Fun House: Cena & Wyatt at WrestleMania 36 was art.


I give WWE props for that. For almost a decade (maybe, even more, depending on your feelings about the Ruthless Aggression Era), it seemed WWE was stagnant. They didn’t need to do anything out of the ordinary, because the competition was no longer relevant. Now, more than ever, not only is competition apparent, there is a major disruption in the consistent programming.


Otis winning the briefcase at Money in the Bank 2020 was an homage to every working person out in the world today. It’s for those who put their lives on the line to feed their families, their children, and importantly, themselves. Otis isn’t that main event guy (yet) that is destined to take over as Universal or Heavyweight champion. But he is someone who every blue-collar or working human being out on the front lines each and every day can relate to. And especially, during these uncertain times, it’s great to unwind and imagine a world where the working person is the true winner in all of the mayhem in the world.

Could Otis become a world champion? Absolutely. While he’s gone on record to say he would cash in on the tag titles, I’d have to suggest Otis keeping the Money in the Bank briefcase for quite some time. This will build a great story for the American worker.

Otis is over. But he’s also the guy that could give hope to all those who are feeling down or defeated. There’s hope. No matter what broken ladder is in your way to success. It’s about being at the right place, at the right time, ready to grab that coveted brass ring opportunity.

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