​Jim Ross Reveals His Favorite Owen Hart Rib + More

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Jim Ross recently spoke with the Province on a
variety of topics. Check out the highlights:

On his favorite Owen Hart rib: “I was having a
long day in my make-shift office at an arena when I was in charge of the talent
roster at WWE. I had an extended conversation with someone that was having
substance-abuse issues; that was our suspicion. Owen saw that my door had been
closed for several hours. (As I headed to the arena to commentate for the TV
broadcast), I catch him coming down the hall, stumbling, bouncing off the walls.
I get up close to him, he’s got this white substance under his nose like he’s
been doing cocaine. Obviously, Owen was not a drug user at all. Long story
short, he’d gone to the desert table at catering and got a powdered doughnut,
trying to cheer me up and say, ‘You had a rough day. A lot of us are
appreciative of what you’re trying to do to help guys.”

On his travel loops with Mid-South in the
1970s:
“The territory I worked in, if you were booked every day you
averaged anywhere from 2,000 to 3,000 miles a week driving. That’s just the way
it was. It wasn’t an extraordinary hardship. It wasn’t anything unusual. It was
just the normal process of doing business I was 22 years old. It was a new
adventure for me.”

On “white knuckle driving moments” he’s had:
“The theory was to drive after every live event at night to the next city. As
the youngest guy in the car, the older guys who were riding with me would take
that opportunity to go to sleep. They didn’t want the windows up, the radio
playing. They didn’t want the normal things one would do to stay awake. There
were a lot of near misses in the days of hitting the ditch and settling back up
on the road. That’s why a lot of guys in those days drove big cars. It wasn’t
just a status thing, for people to think you’re successful driving a big car.
You felt more protected in a large vehicle – a Cadillac, Lincoln, Oldmobile,
Buick.”


On who was more charismatic between Muhammad Ali or Mike
Tyson:
“Oh, Ali was the best. He was a better talker. He was a natural
talker. He told me years ago he learned early on in his boxing career that he
could make a whole lot more money motivating people to come see him lose than
come see him win. He got that theory watching pro wrestling growing up in
Louisville, Kentucky … Mike was wonderful to work with because he was such a
devout fan of wrestling. Mike knew more history of wrestling than Muhammad knew,
but Muhammad knew the overall philosophy.”


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